Fall of Day

Emanating from these photographs is a combination of visibilities.  They are visibly voyeuristic in both subject matter and approach.  They reveal invisible nuances through photographic technique.  And finally, they examine human vision and the insistence of its superiority over all other senses, in spite of it being the one thing machinery seems able to transcend.

"...night that knows it's night would not be night but the fall of day."

-Georges Bataille

 

"...the theory changes the reality it describes."

-K.W. Jeter

 

The Fall of Day photographs are a shot in the dark, taken when the sky is black using long exposure times, and then printed ‘underexposed’.  The result is images of a falsified twilight – hazy blue-grey skies, sickly green grass. Too bright light blares out of the windows, fending off what appears to be an impending darkness that is, in actuality, already upon them.

 

Many details that take center stage in the final photographic image are not visible by human observation at the time taken.. These details make their appearance only collectively. But then, the truth of representation is that it has always been such.

"Fetish Object #9" (1998)

"Fetish Object #9" (1998)

from the series "Fall of Day" c-print 20" x 16"

"Fetish Object #10"

"Fetish Object #10"

from the series "Fall of Day" c-print 20" x 16"